Author Archives: Jen

19th ICPIC Conference – Bogota 2019

GET READY, GET SET, AND THEN GO …
to the 2019 ICPIC conference, Bogota,Columbia.
Our wonderful hosts in Bogota are working hard in an effort to put on the best ICPIC conference ever!  The official invitation will come out soon. In the meantime, mark your calendars, and begin working on your submissions. Be there or be square!

19TH
   ICPIC BIENNAL CONFERENCE 2019
Philosophy for/with Children and the Citizen

Pre-conference 23 and 24th of July; conference 25, 26 and 27th of July; post-conference 28th of July

 

Media and Moral Education: a philosophy of critical engagement

Media and Moral Education: a philosophy of critical engagement
Laura D’Olimpio argues that philosophical thinking skills support the adoption of an attitude she calls critical perspectivism. To read more Click here.
The book argues that the current oversight of the educational environment not keeping pace with rapid advances in technology, despite the fact that educating students to engage critically and compassionately with others via online media is of the utmost importance. It will be of interest to academics, researchers and postgraduate students in the areas of philosophy of education, philosophy, education, critical theory and communication, film and media studies.

Philosophy Now: article on P4C

Children, Intuitive Knowledge & Philosophy
Maria daVenza Tillmanns argues that teaching children to think must involve more than simply teaching them cognitive skills.
Read the article here.
Maria daVenza Tillmanns is a former President of the American Society for Philosophy, Counseling, and Psychotherapy (ASPCP). She is seeking funding for a project in partnership with the University of California, San Diego, about doing philosophy with children in underserved schools.

 

Special Issue: Journal of Philosophy in Schools

Special Issue: Journal of Philosophy in Schools
Much ink has been spilt on the question of how philosophy might be taught in schools—on the forms of pedagogy appropriate to the subject, the levels of abstraction at which children can think, and the philosophical problems most likely to inspire their interest. Rather less attention has been given to exactly why it should be taught https://researchonline.nd.edu.au/jps/

The Most Reasonable Answer: Helping Students Build Better Arguments Together

The Most Reasonable Answer: Helping Students Build Better Arguments Together
Authors: Alina Reznitskaya, Montclair State University (known to many of us in the P4/wC community) and Ian Wilkinson, The Ohio State University

This book is based on a strong collaboration among researchers, teachers, and P4C practitioners and offers a rich array of field-tested materials that support teachers in facilitating productive discussions in upper-elementary grades.

The Most Reasonable Answer is an innovative and comprehensive guide to engaging students in inquiry dialogue—a type of talk used in text-based classroom discussions. During inquiry dialogue, students collectively search for the most reasonable answers to big, controversial questions, and, as a result, enhance their argumentation skills and develop a deep understanding of the texts they read. Based on years of research and work in nearly fifty classrooms, this book is an essential resource for educators looking for new ways to teach critical thinking and engage students in high-quality discourse.

Download discount coupons fromt he publisher here;

        The Most Reasonable Answer-Europe.pdf

         The Most Reasonable Answer-USA.pdf

 

New Publication: The Most Reasonabe Answer

The Most Reasonable Answer: Helping Students Build Better Arguments Together
Authors:  Alina Reznitskaya and Ian Wilkinson.

The book is based on a strong collaboration among researchers, teachers, and P4C practitioners and offers a rich array of field-tested materials that support teachers in facilitating productive discussions in upper-elementary grades. READ MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK HERE

 

Ann M. Sharp’s Contribution to P4C and Education

In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp:
Chi
ldhood, Philosophy and Education
Edited by Maughn Rollins Gregory and Megan Jane Laverty.

ICPIC is excited to announce this a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers.  READ MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK HERE 

 

Philosophical Inquiry in the New Global Reality

Inclusion, Diversity, and Intercultural Dialogue in Young People’s Philosophical Inquiry”
Edited by: Ching-Ching Lin and Lavina Sequeira

Each chapter offers a unique perspective in understanding the place of philosophical inquiry and philosophy in education and prioritizes diversity in the classroom community of inquiry.
READ MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK HERE

Incorporating theoretical perspectives and empirical research, this book provides a rich resource for school teachers and educators who wish to engage diverse learners in philosophical inquiry. In doing so, it reaffirms the value of philosophy education as a proactive approach to democratic education. 

Free Preview Inclusion, Diversity, and Intercultural Dialogue in Young People’s Philosophical Inquiry
ISBN Paperback: 9789463510639 ($ 32.00)
ISBN Hardcover: 9789463510646 ($ 99.00)
ISBN E-Book: 9789463510653

 

ICPIC Journal: Philosophy and Childhood


New Issue: Vol 13, No 27 ( 2017)
Look inside the current Table of contents

Childhood and Philosophy is designed to be one of ICPIC’s many voices. In keeping with the lively poly-vocal character of the organization, we publish papers in at least six languages. This practice signifies our commitment, not only to the integrity of each piece of work in its mother tongue, but to our hopes for an increasing capacity amongst readers to work in multiple languages. Continue reading

Ann Sharp’s Contribution to Philosophy for Children and Education

“In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp:
Childhood, Philosophy and Education”

Edited by Maughn Rollins Gregory and Megan Jane Laverty.
Routledge 2017.

ICPIC is excited to share the news of a new publication (a critical anthology) on the work of our late colleague, Ann Margaret Sharp, who joined Montclair State College in 1973 where she met Matthew Lipman and became his life-long partner in the work of Philosophy for Children. Mat and Ann co-founded the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children at Montclair in 1974.

More than anyone else in the world, Ann was responsible for the spread of Philosophy for/with Children around the world, the creation of graduate degree programs in the area, and the theorization of the “community of philosophical inquiry.  This new book’s introduction provides some interesting detail about the history of Philosophy for/with Children, and a new interview with Ann reveals the origin of her experiments in community of inquiry as a house parent to a group of “troubled” teenage boys at a residential school in New Hampshire.

This exciting scholarly volume is due to the work and dedication of two friends and colleagues of Ann Sharp, Maughn Gregory and Megan Laverty – we owe them a huge debt of gratitude in initiating this project and guiding it to completion. It offers invaluable insight and rigorous analaysis of the contribution of Ann Sharp to the Philosophy for Children movement. For more information click here:

 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Contributors Editorial Introduction: Ann Margaret Sharp: A Life Teaching Community

Where I Learned Community of Inquiry: Ann Margaret Sharp in Conversation with Peter Shea

PART I Ann Margaret Sharp on Pragmatism and the Community of Inquiry

1. The Theory of Education Made Flesh (Philip Cam)

2. What is a Community of Inquiry? (Ann Margaret Sharp)

3. Self-Transformation in the Community of Inquiry (Ann Margaret Sharp)

PART II Ann Margaret Sharp on Philosophy of Education, Pedagogy, Teacher Education and the Community of Inquiry

4. The Teacher as Liberator: Ann Margaret Sharp between Philosophy of Education and Teacher Education (Stefano Oliverio)

5. Education and Culture: A Nietzschean Perspective (Ann Margaret Sharp)

6. A Letter to a Novice Teacher: Teaching Harry Stottlemeier’s Discovery (Ann Margaret Sharp)

PART III Ann Margaret Sharp on Ethics, Personhood, and the Community of Inquiry

7. Living in, and with, our Relationships to Others (Laurance J. Splitter)

8. Philosophy for Children and Development of Ethical values (Ann Margaret Sharp)

9. Looking at Others’ Faces (Ann Margaret Sharp and Megan Jane Laverty)

PART IV Ann Margaret Sharp on Feminism, Women, Children and the Community of Inquiry

10. Education as Liberation (María Teresa de la Garza)

11. Towards a Feminist Philosophy of Education: Simone Weil on Force, Goodness, work, Method and Time (Ann Margaret Sharp and Maughn Rollins Gregory)

PART V Ann Margaret Sharp on Religion, Spirituality, Ritual, Aesthetics and the Community of Inquiry

12. Do we Put What is Precious at Risk through Philosophic Conversation? (Peter Shea)

13. Silence and Speech in Pixie (Ann Margaret Sharp)

14. Is there an Essence of Education? (Ann Margaret Sharp)

PART VI Ann Margaret Sharp on Caring Thinking, Education of the Emotions and the Community of Inquiry

15.Caring Thinking, Education of Emotions, and the Community of Inquiry: a Psychological Perspective (Richard E. Morehouse)

16. The Other Dimension of Caring Thinking (Ann Margaret Sharp)

PART VII Ann Margaret Sharp on Social-Political, Democratic, International/Global Education and the Community of Inquiry

17. Social-Political Dimensions of the Community of Philosophical Inquiry in an Age of Globalization (Jennifer Glaser)

18. The Role of Intelligent Sympathy in Educating for Global Ethical Consciousness (Ann Margaret Sharp)

19. The Community of Inquiry: Education for Democracy (Ann Margaret Sharp)

Poem: The Community of Inquiry (Ann Margaret Sharp)